Which Super Hero Would Your Online Marketing Strategy Be? The PPC Optimization Edition

Pay per click (PPC) ads aren’t successful over night, and as you know from our last post in this series, a few online advertising strategies or super heroic powers can be used to quickly optimize your campaigns to profitability. If you thought optimization strategies for PPC campaigns were boring and menial tasks think again, because you might be using these extraordinary powers in your daily routine.

The PPC Optimization Edition

Here are a few of our favorite X-Men characters and their powers that can be used for optimizing PPC campaigns. Tell us in the comments section below which character’s powers has given you the most performance lift when optimizing campaigns.

Wolverine: Campaign Segmentation

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The Super Power: Wolverine possesses retractable claws within each forearm. They can cut through practically any known solid material, segmenting metals, woods, and even stone into pieces. His abilities are similar to campaign segmentation, which is the process of breaking up your campaigns by network, location, or device. Wolverine’s ability to heal from any wound, disease or toxin at an accelerated rate is just another signal of proof that sharpening Wolverine’s powers of campaign segmentation can rapidly bring your poorly performing campaigns back from the dead.

How to Own It: Segmenting campaigns by network is the easiest way to exercise your inner Wolverine. Search and Display are two very different types of advertising channels, and should be measured and accounted for differently. To segment an existing campaign, you can visit the AdWords campaign settings and edit the “Type” of campaign. In Bing Ads, it’s a bit trickier to segment by network, but it absolutely can be done at the Ad group level under Advanced Settings in the “Ad distribution” field. If you’re already segmenting by network, wield your Wolverine claws with a more advanced strategy: segment by location or device. When segmenting by location or device, this allows you to create more relevant ad copy for the location or ad extensions for the particular device and gives you the control to set bids higher for strategic markets or devices with smaller screens.

Storm: Dayparting

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The Super Power: Storm is one of the most influential mutants on the planet, with the power to manipulate the weather. Her precise control over the atmosphere allows her to create special weather effects such has whirlwinds, humidity, precipitation, lighting, and atmospheric pressure. Just like the weather, your ads’ performance changes throughout the day. In order to control that performance in your favor, create a Storm moment with dayparting.

How to Own It: In order for this power to work in your favor, you’ll need to have some data from your existing ads or keywords so you can see what hours of the days are getting the most clicks or acquiring the most conversions. To analyze the hour by hour trends in AdWords, go to the Dimensions tab at the Ad group level and make sure to open the View: Hour of day report. In Bing Ads, you can view the same report by visiting the Reports tab, and selecting the Show: Hour of day report. Now that you’re equipped with the right data to control the weather of your ads, create a Storm by adjusting the Schedule settings at the Ad group level.

Morph: Dynamic Creative

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The Super Power: Morph, as his name suggests, is a shape shifter and can morph his physical appearance and voice to resemble any person or object he chooses. His ability to alter his form is similar to the way advertisers can use dynamic creatives to instantly change the ad copy for more relevancy to the audience. Morph also has limited telepathic abilities, allowing him the ability to read minds, similar to the way dynamic keyword insertion can automatically insert the keyword that’s on a person’s mind.

How to Own It: In order to perfect the powers of Morph, you’ll need to use dynamic creatives. You can either use dynamic text or dynamic keyword insertion for your ads. The way dynamic text works if you want to make changes to many of your ads without having to edit them all of them manually. Dynamic keyword insertion is when your ad automatically uses the keyword that was queried in your ad. There are many types of dynamic insertion tags you can use in your headlines, description lines, and display URLs, such as {Keyword:text}, {param1:text}, and {param2:text}. If you’re not already Morph-ing your ads and want to find out how powerful and efficient this strategy can be for your business, Morph your ads and use dynamic creatives in AdWords or Bing Ads.

Have you used these super powers when running your online ad campaigns? Let me know in the comments which character’s powers you’ve used in the past, and how you were able to own it to optimize your campaigns.

3 Last Minute Holiday Campaign Tips to Reach Those Last Minute Shoppers

With the biggest holiday shopping season almost nearing to an end, we’ve compiled some last minute campaign strategies for you to reach those last minute shoppers.  Before the year ends, secure a spike in revenue over the next several days with these quick and simple last minute tips for your holiday campaigns:

 

1.  Increase sales with the last minute shoppers

Tweak your ad copy to make it more relevant to the holiday shopper. Update your ad copy to have a holiday spin on it and attract the last minute shoppers. “Arrives by 12/24” or “Last Minute Stocking Stuffers” are great examples of how you can spice up your ad copy to entice those last minute shoppers to click and purchase.

 

2.  Increase clicks and engaged viewers from your ads

Your ad design and copy is what compels a user to click or not. Since you’ve already tweaked your ad copy with the above strategy, try varying up the design a little.  Because we’re on the homestretch of the holidays, no need to re-invent the wheel here.  A simple A/B test with the color of the background or the color of the call-to-action button on your banner ads could be the difference between profit and breaking even this holiday season.

 

3.  Outperform your competitors on price for your most popular items

You already know what products account for 80% of your revenue.  Find these same or similar products from competing advertisers on MixRank.com to see their pricing model.  Based on what you discover, consider pricing your products similarly or offering free shipping or another perk with a purchase. 

 

With MixRank’s easy-to-use search bar, you can instantly research the competitive market for your products, without spending hours mining through your competitors’ landing pages for the same data. To get started, gain access to MixRank Professional with your risk-free trial here.

5 Lessons PPC Advertisers Can Learn From The Justin Timberlake & Jessica Biel Wedding

Just last week, Justin Timberlake and Jessica Biel said “I Do” in southern Italy.  As the photos and details unfold in the media, it’s been pretty difficult to avoid the juicy gossip.  Paging through multiple articles got me to thinking how clever Justin Timberlake and Jessica Biel are, and how online advertisers could learn a some serious advertising strategy from their over the top, yet intimate wedding.   Here’s the list of 5 lessons PPC advertisers can learn from the Justin Timberlake & Jessica Biel Wedding:

 

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1. The Pink Dress:  Whether the critics love it or hate it, nearly everyone has something to say about Jessica’s amazing pink wedding gown.  The dress is untraditional, irregular, and eccentric, but according to Justin Timberlake, “It was so Jess.”  Think about this when generating compelling ad creative.  Design your ads to be innovative, eye-catching, and the talk of the town, yet completely true to your brand.

 

2. The Wedding Day Accessories:  Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue.  Although I haven’t heard what Jessica’s something blue was, her “something new” was the pink Giambattista Valli Haute Couture gown.  To add to this, her “something old” was on her custom veil, adorned with heirloom pearls that were from her grandmother’s wedding day tiara, while her “something borrowed” was a light pink pearl bracelet loaned to her by Justin’s mother.  These added accessories complemented each other nicely and were consistent across her outfit, something online advertisers should do with their ad groups and landing pages as well.  Ensuring that the keywords in your ad are in line with the keywords or placements that you’re targeting and the keywords on your landing page will result in an overall improvement in your ad’s relevancy, impacting click-through rate and Quality Score.

 

3.  The Reported $6.5 Million Cost: There have been numerous rumors that the couple spent $6.5 million for their special day – sounds like a pretty amazing ad budget right?  But, as you know, that money wasn’t just spent on one thing.  There was the food, photos, entertainment, flowers, dresses, decorations, and many more elements that summed up to the total wedding budget enhancing the overall event.  This is the same way you should plan out your ad budget.  Separate your online ad campaigns into different segments, whether it’s by network, device targeting, geography or anything else that will help you increase relevancy for the audience and optimize your overall cost per acquisition.

 

4.  The Small & Intimate Destination Wedding:  The fancy affair took place in Southern Italy and has been described as an intimate wedding of 100 guests.  Timberlake said, “It was a lot to ask of them to travel, so we figured we’d give our guests a good party!”  This is a great example of what your landing page experience should bring to the table.  It has to be worth visiting and staying on.  If you’re shelling out $6.5 million on advertising to gain 100 new visitors, make sure you have the elements on your landing page that will give visitors a good time on your site, and convert!

 

5.  The Last Ones Standing: The ceremony finally concluded around 5:00am, as Justin and Jessica were the last two on the dance floor.  As an online advertiser, you can and should continually make optimization adjustments to your campaigns that will allow you to maintain a steady click-through rate or even outperform the competition. You want your ads to be the last ones standing at the end of the day, rather than miss out on any “dance floor time” or impressions share.

 

What are some examples of how you’ve exercised best practices from Mr. & Mrs. Timberlake’s wedding in your own ad campaigns?  Have you had an ad that really resembled the pink dress? Or maybe you’ve used some sweet optimization tips worth sharing.  Tell us in the comments below.

 

Thanks for reading! Follow me on Twitter or add me to your G+ circles for more PPC advertising tips.

 

Cure Your SEM Blues with this 4-Step Account Audit

This guest post is by Richard Conn, Account Director of DataPop. DataPop’s mission is to make marketers lives easier and give them the technology they need to build ads that people love to click on. DataPop uses complex natural language text generation systems that extract a consumer’s underlying intent and matches it to optimized offers at massive scale.  On average, their clients see a 40% increase in online conversions at a 15% lower CPA. Follow the company on Twitter: @DataPop

 

Things go wrong. You wake up sick, the car won’t start, your boss is on your back, and your SEM campaigns are drifting south. We all feel under the weather at some point, but there are steps you can take to perk up your campaign performance.

 

1) Getting STARTed

When arriving on the scene of a disaster, folks in the medical field follow the principle of START: Simple Triage And Rapid Treatment. The goal is to quickly evaluate the situation and focus your attention on the areas where it will have the maximum impact. Your SEM campaigns may not be a disaster, but the same principles can be applied gain some quick wins. The first step is to categorize your campaigns into three buckets:

•Healthy campaigns. These are your high performing campaigns, such as brand campaigns, that don’t need any immediate attention. For these, maintain the status quo and revisit once you’ve stabilized your sick campaigns.

•Zombie campaigns. These are the campaigns that have never performed well, such as generic, broadly targeted campaigns. These can drag down performance fast, so consider pausing these campaigns, bidding them lower, or severely restricting their daily budgets to contain the damage.

•Sick campaigns. These are the campaigns that show some promise and might perform well if given immediate care. Focus most of your efforts here to improve overall account health.

 

2) Stop the Bleeding

The next step is to identify what is dragging down your sick campaigns. Pull a keyword performance report, a placement performance report, and a search query report for the last 90 days. For each report, look for keywords, placements, or queries that meet the following criteria:

  • Accumulated costs that are 3x your CPA target, but no conversions
  • Have a CPA that is 3x above target
  • Have an unusually low CTR and no conversions

– Below 0.10% for keywords and queries
– Below 0.01% for placements

  • Have a high number of impressions and zero clicks

– Above 1,000 impressions for keywords and queries
– Above 10,000 impressions for placements

Pause the keywords that meet these criteria. Add the placements and queries that meet these criteria as negatives to your campaigns. This simple fix should give you an immediate bump in performance.

 

3) Diagnose the Disease

Now that you have some quick wins under your belt, it’s time to dive deep to identify underlying issues that have held back performance.

Disease: Monochromatic Ad Copy

  • Symptoms: Majority of traffic is concentrated on a small set of headlines or description lines. Ads repeated across multiple ad groups.
  • Treatment: If you are heavily reliant on running the same ads across all of your campaigns, try to generate a few new variations to introduce to your highest volume ad groups. This can boost performance by better matching your ad to the keywords.

Disease: Acute Ad Deficiency

  • Symptoms: Ad groups with only one active ad. This hurts performance as not every keyword within an ad group will perform well with the same ad.
  • Treatment: Add additional ads to ad groups that only have one active ad. Ideally, each ad group should have 2 to 4 active ads.

Disease: Ad Overdose

  • Symptoms: Ad groups with five or more active ads. This hurts performance by making it difficult to accumulate enough data to identify winning ads.
  • Treatment: In each ad group, pause the poorest performing ads so that only 2 to 4 ads remain active.

Disease: Keyword Chaos

  • Symptoms: Ad groups with 25+ keywords hurt performance by combining multiple intents. For example: ‘black dress’ and ‘red dress’ should be split into two ad groups so you can write ads specific to each color.
  • Treatment: Break out large ad groups into smaller ad groups Ideally, each ad group should have less than 25 keywords.

Disease: Match Type Mayhem

  • Symptoms: Traffic volume concentrated on Broad match keywords. This hurts performance by pulling in irrelevant queries.
  • Treatment: Identify high performing keywords from search query reports and add them into your campaigns as Exact match keywords. Consider breaking out your campaigns by match type and adding the Exact match keywords as negatives to your Broad match campaign to prevent cross-mapping and internal competition.

Disease: Under-Extension

  • Symptoms: Missing campaign extensions
  • Treatment: Be sure to add Sitelink Extensions, Call Extensions, Product Extensions, and Location Extensions to your campaigns. These can give a big boost to CTR and conversion rates.

Disease: Campaign Setting Sickness (the silent killer)

  • Symptoms: Are all campaigns set to accelerated delivery?
  • Treatment: The best practice is to set all campaigns to accelerated delivery and to then manage spend via bidding. If you are running out of budget early in the day, then you should be able to bid lower and gain additional clicks for the same cost.
  • Symptoms: Are any campaigns showing ‘limited by budget’?
  • Treatment: If so, consider either bidding lower or increasing the daily budget.
  • Symptoms: Are search and content segmented into separate campaigns?
  • Treatment: Always, always, always separate search and content into their own campaigns. They perform very differently and co-mingling your data will make it extremely difficult to optimize.
  • Symptoms: Are mobile devices segmented into separate campaigns?
  • Treatment: Computers and tablets arguably have similar performance profiles. However, mobile devices are often much more difficult to complete transaction on, tend to have shorter queries and lower CPCs, and tend to work best for providing local information or for driving calls.
  • Symptoms: Are languages segmented into separate campaigns?
  • Treatment: This will allow you to tailor your ads to the preferred language of your users.
  • Symptoms: Are countries segmented into separate campaigns?
  • Treatment: Likewise, this will allow for greater customization of your campaigns.
  • Symptoms: Are ads set to rotate evenly, optimize for clicks, or optimize for conversions?
  • Treatment: Rotating ads evenly is useful for testing creative messaging. Optimizing for clicks may boost your overall CTR and lower your CPC, but clicks ≠ conversions, so use with caution. Optimizing for conversions may work on campaigns with a high number of conversions, but won’t work for campaigns with few conversions.

 

4) Keep Calm and Car
ry On

Once you’ve rehabilitated your sick campaigns, you can maintain their good health through routine checkups.

Daily Tasks

  • Monitor performance
  • Bid management

Weekly Tasks

  • Check keyword performance report, search query report, and placement performance report for new negatives

Monthly Tasks

  • Pause out poor performing ads
  • Add new ads to high volume ad groups

Quarterly Tasks

  • Check campaign settings

 

By following this simple prescription, you can have your SEM campaign in tip-top shape in no time!

 

 

How to keep display ad A/B testing from blowing up in your face

This guest post is by Myles Younger, co-founder of Canned Banners. Canned Banners provides a platform and tools for automating and streamlining display ad design. Follow the company on Twitter at @cannedbanners.

Online advertisers, especially search marketers, understand the power of A/B testing. In search, the most successful advertisers will constantly A/B test hundreds of different ads. With the recent growth in display advertising, it’s logical for online marketers to try and apply their A/B testing expertise to the world of display.

However, data-driven marketers should be careful before diving into display advertising. This post is going to explain some key differences between search ads and display ads, and offer some tips on how to keep your display ad design budget (and your sanity) under control when you’re doing large-scale A/B tests.

Notes: I’m not including Facebook ads when I say “display ads.” That could be a whole other blog post, and I’m not really qualified to write it. Nor am I considering landing page optimization, which is a critical factor in ad testing, but I needed to keep my focus limited.

Search ads are simple. Display ads are complex.

Before we go further, it’s important to appreciate just how much more complex a display ad is versus a search ad. Here’s some rough math to give you an idea of the difference in complexity:

Why is complexity important? With search ads, your creative palette is constrained to one element: text. With display ads, you could potentially test an infinite variety of elements: text, color, imagery, fonts, animation, button style, etc. So while it’s almost impossible to create an “ugly” search ad, it’s very, very easy to make poor choices and create an ugly display ad.

Tip #1 — Start with good designs

Even though you might need to test potentially hundreds of different ad variations, don’t cut corners and launch with garbage ad creative. Finding out that Crappy Display Ad A beat Crappy Display Ad B is like learning that horse manure smells slightly better than dog poop. Don’t waste your money & time.

If you think you can randomly test crappy designs and eventually iterate your way to a perfect, beautiful display ad, read the previous graphic again (and maybe study up on how exponents work); the universe won’t be around long enough to perform all the necessary design iterations to hit paydirt. Launch with thoughtful, professional ad designs that you feel good about.

This doesn’t mean you need to spend weeks & weeks designing your first round of ads, but don’t just throw some clipart and tacky text effects into a box and call it a display ad. In general, ugly ads won’t perform very well and they’ll make you and/or your client look bad.

Once you’ve got some solid starting designs, you can go nuts with rapid iteration and experimentation.

And if you don’t know why the ad below on the left is godawful, read the next tip.

Tip #2 — Hire a professional

Most people are horrible designers. If you’re not confident in your design skills, hire someone to design a few templates that you can use. To get some good design ideas, browse around online and find well-designed display ads with layouts that could work well as templates.

And if you want a self-serve solution, that’s what my company does (I’ll leave it up to you to find our competitors and figure out why we’re better).

Tip #3 — Use stock photography

At Canned Banners, we see hundreds of display ads designed by amateurs. What’s the number one thing that ruins otherwise good ads? Bad frikkin’ photography. Do not cut corners and make ads using blurry snapshots from your smartphone. Go to inexpensive stock photo websites like istockphoto.com, thinkstock.com or shutterstock.com and buy high-quality photos taken by professional photographers.

Extra Tip-within-a-Tip: Most stock photo websites sell subscriptions. They can be pricey, but if you’re doing high-volume A/B testing, a subscription or package deal is going to be much cheaper than buying images one at a time.

Stock photo websites are also a quick source of design variations that you can test. Running a campaign for a real estate company? Use one ad template and buy 50 good real estate images (the nice house, the “for sale” sign, the happy homeowner couple, the happy agent, etc), throw them in your ads, and see which photos perform best.

That’s enough tips…for now

I could keep going for several more pages, but if you’ve read this far, thanks! I hope these tips give you some food for thought. If you have any questions about display ad design, email me here or follow @cannedbanners on Twitter.

Cheers!
Myles

6 Killer Facebook Ads Image Tactics That Will Skyrocket Your CTR

Don’t want to manually sift through the 11,000 Facebook ads images I posted earlier to find the good ones? Don’t worry, I did the hard work for you and found 11 excellent images that demonstrate some of the most effective techniques in Facebook advertising.I know that even if I ask nicely that you don’t copy these exact images for your own campaigns, some of you will do so anyway. Just keep in mind that these specific images are already very saturated and overused. If you find a stylistically similar but fresh image, you will get a much higher CTR, guaranteed, which could be the difference between profit and loss in your campaign.When selecting an image, remember that its purpose is to attract attention and entice the user to notice your ad. With apologies to Gary Halbert, you can think of your image as an ad for your ad. What would get your ad noticed?I tried to focus on a general effective tactic when selecting these rather than just a particular image. Read on, and you’ll see what I mean.Note: Posting these images is kind of a gray area which may or may not be fair use. If you can prove one of these images belongs to you, please send me a DMCA notice to ilya -at- unviral.com and I will take it down immediately. 1. Use lots of color The gradient background is a classic, time tested social advertising technique. It may not work for all niches, but it can be extremely effective in getting the attention of certain demographics. And anything bright and colorful will stand out among Facebook’s drab, pale blue interface.

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2. Add Banners And Badges I love the use of the word New! in the following ad. Not only is saying “New” a classic marketing technique, but the its design and placement in the lower right corner cleverly draws the eye towards the body of the ad.

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3. Mimic UI Elements Years of using modern operating systems have conditioned most people to respond in a very specific way to certain graphical elements. For example, our eye is naturally drawn to buttons that look clickable, just like we’re trained to draw our attention to a small mouse cursor on the screen. These techniques are controversial, but if you can get them approved, you can benefit from a dramatic increase in CTR. People routinely accomplished 30-50 percent increases in CTR just by overlaying a picture of a small Play arrow(like a YouTube video) on their image. This is no longer allowed, but some of these techniques might be:

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4. Faces are very effective, but sex always sells In the early days of Facebook Ads, all you had to do was present a picture showing a little cleavage to get massive clicks. They’ve cracked down on how much skin you can show since then, but don’t worry- the right picture of a face can be just as appealing as the sluttiest softcore porn pics. Closeups, especially those images that seem to be staring straight at the user from the page look very effective.Pictures of cute girls for the men, and of babies for the women work very well. We’re just biologically hardwired by millions of years of evolution to respond to them.

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Of course, if you’re feeling adventurous, you can always try to sneak in something vaguely pornographic…

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5. Don’t underestimate the power of plain text It can often be very effective to simply treat the image as more space for your text headline, particularly if you have a strong, clear value proposition with universal appeal that can be expressed in just a few words.

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6. When all else fails, shock Like a tabloid, you can always rely on shock value. Assuming you can get creepy or weird ads approved, you can get a very good CTR for certain demographics very quickly. These ads probably won’t convert very well, but for some offers or sites where getting clicks as cheap as possible is the objective, this is a valid strategy.

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This isn’t a comprehensive list by any means, but it should be enough to give you a few ideas on specific tactics you can use right now to increase your CTR, get more traffic, and lower your costs.

11,701 Effective Facebook Ads Images

As I mentioned in my previous post on Facebook Ads strategy, social advertising is purely a numbers game. If you can maintain your cost per click(CPC)<earnings per click(EPC) as you scale up your ad spend, you can stand to generate a lot of revenue very quickly on the margins.In order to maintain low CPC, you need a high CTR. And if you’ve ever advertised on social ads, you know that there’s one very important factor in getting a high CTR on Facebook- it’s all about the image.Choosing an effective set of images to test is critical to the success of your Facebook ads campaign. However, it can be time-consuming and expensive to determine by trial and error what kind of image is most effective.With that in mind, I wanted to share a few images I collected from actual Facebook ads, so you can see what is actually working for current advertisers on the Facebook Ads platform.Simply stealing some of these images for use in your own campaigns would be stupid- they’re already in use, and being saturated on Facebook Ads. Users on social platforms quickly develop banner blindness towards ads and images they’ve seen before, so you’re unlikely to find success by simply ripping some random images from this collection.The smart advertiser will take a macro view and browse through these images more broadly. As you look through them, you’ll begin to see common patterns and trends emerge, and develop a sense for what kinds of techniques and types of images are most effective on Facebook ads.Apply these techniques to your own campaigns, and you’ll instantly see significant improvements in CTR and profitability. For example, there’s a certain type and color of border I’m going to try that I think will do very well.I’m NOT going to post the targeting,headline, text or destination URL for these ads, because that would be outing entire campaigns and I’m not going that far, so don’t even bother asking.Methodology:I looked at about 250,000 Facebook ads targeting all English speaking countries(US,CA,UK,etc) in late September through early October 2010 and collected the images.These are not images I just think might work on Facebook ads.All of these images were actually recently used in Facebook ads, and many of them are undoubtedly very successful for the advertisers using them.After sorting through them and removing duplicates, I was left with 11,701 unique images.I also sorted images by how frequently they appeared/were used/copied to find the most popular and presumably most effective ones. But I don’t think I’m ready to release that data just yet. Again, don’t ask.Note to Facebook: I didn’t scrape these from Facebook myself, or touch Facebook’s servers in any way to get these, so please don’t be mad at me. To the best of my knowledge, I’m fully within my rights to link to this image archive.Bonus IdeaThe more astute among you might notice that PlentyofFish uses the same image dimensions and general ad format as Facebook. This is done intentionally to encourage advertisers to copy their campaigns over to the PoF platform. I’m sure PoF would love it if you took some of the high converting images found in this collection and tried on them on the much less competitive PoF platform.In case you’re too lazy to look through the files yourself, I’ll be posting some – but not all – of my favorites in a few days. Expect more outrage as I out people’s highest-converting images.Download:http://www.mediafire.com/?1er5b873e7rylu2Mirror:http://rapidshare.com/files/426415383/fbimages.zipArchive Password: www.insight.io