Seven Smart Standards for Google Shopping

This is a guest post by Jacques van der Wilt, the founder of WordWatch and DataFeedWatch.

Google Shopping replaced the free Google Product Search in October 2012. If you look at a Product Listing Ad (PLA), you immediately see why this ad-type is much more powerful.

Results from various agencies shows that these picture-ads outperform text ads on conversion rate and cpc. American merchants are already spending up to 30% of their budget on Google Shopping.

If you are getting started with PLAs, go by the Seven Smart Standards below to get the most out of your Google Shopping campaign.

1.  The Basics: Get ’em right
Before you start bidding, make sure that you have covered the basics:

  • Export your product feed to your Google Merchant Center (GMC) and link your GMC to your AdWords account.
  • Make sure that your feed is updated on a daily basis, so your ads always reflect your current offerings.
  • The feed has to meet all Google’s requirements. If it doesn’t, Google just won’t show your ads. Check for errors in your Google Merchant Center and use a data feed optimization tool if you need to solve any. This includes assigning the proper Google Categories to your products. The more specific the sub-category, the better your conversion rate.
  • Remember to organize your sales funnel. No matter how grand your campaigns may be, you need to convert visitors to buyers on your website.
  • Have tracking code for AdWords & Analytics installed on your site.
  • Google doesn’t want you to shout and will not accept Titles in UPPER case or with exclamation marks!!!
  • Product Listing Ads on Google’s Search Engine Result Page (SERP) generate the major part of the traffic generated by Google Shopping. Only a small part originates from the Google Shopping site. So when you start optimizing your feed and your campaign, focus on the SERP!

2.  The Picture: Worth more than a 1,000 words
The pictures of the PLAs are powerful. Everyone’s eyes are drawn to it. The picture may be more important for an apparel merchant than for a shop selling widgets, but still: it is human nature to judge a book by the cover. So make every effort to get the best possible pics of your products. Also: if you have several pictures for each product, make sure that the best one is the one that is shown in your PLA.

3.  The Title: Make me beautiful
Titles may be less powerful, but remember that a PLA only has 3 components and this is the second one. So make ‘m work. Make them compelling. Include the brand if it adds value (What is ‘501’ without Levi’s). And put the most important message in the first part: Google will allow you up to 70 characters, but on the SERP, everything after approx. 30 characters is cut off.

4.  The Price: Less important than you might think
On Google Shopping, consumers will actively sort on price and if your product is not among the cheapest, it will not make the buyer’s shortlist. But on the SERP, price comparison plays a much smaller role. People see 8 products at the most and they can only sort on price visually. So don’t focus too much on competing on price: Bidding 10% more to make sure your PLA always makes it to the SERP, will probably cost you a lot less than sacrificing your gross margin. If you advertise the same products on other Comparison Shopping Engines, price is of course still important.

5.  The Bids: Follow the money
The key to setting bids is to create product targets that have a similar conversion rate. But you have to bear in mind where you make your money and apply several of the following strategies:

  • Brand & Product type: this makes sense when you get started. Products of a similar type or brand may have similar conversion rates. So set a bid for each brand or product type (or combination of the two) and then start optimizing based on the results.
  • The 80/20 rule: Most shops have a few products that generate a large part of the revenue. Each of those products should get their own product target (use the ID-attribute) so you can monitor and optimize your best selling products.
  • Gross margin: If 2 products have the same conversion rate, but a very different gross margin, you don’t want them to be in the same product target: You want to bid more on the product that makes you more money.
  • AdWords Labels: you may find that the blue shirts have a much higher conversion rate than the other colors. Or the large screens do better than the small ones. In that case, you want to increase your bid for the blue ones or the large ones. AdWords enables you to set a bid for any attribute, if you add that attribute to your data feed as an AdWords Label. So modify your feed to include your favorite attribute and use it to create a separate product target.

6.  The Losers: Take ’em out
You should not advertise all your products. Analyze your data and ask yourself: which products are really making me money? Take the losers out of your feed and stop wasting your money there. Examples:

  • Seasonal products: don’t sell winter stuff in April
  • Cheap products: the CPA often exceeds the gross margin. So you lose money every time you sell an item.
  • The Unsellables: some products just won’t sell. Maybe Google is not the right channel, maybe these products have a bad landing page, maybe you just can’t compete for these products or maybe they are sooooo 2009.

You have 3 ways to deal with that:
a. Find out why they have a poor performance and fix it.
b. Put your losers in separate product targets and make sure you don’t end up losing money on them
c. Exclude them from your feed completely and focus on your winners.

7.  The Feed: Foundation of it all
Getting Google to accept your feed is just a start. But once you have figured out how to deal with the previous 6 items, it’s time to optimize your feed, so that it serves as a perfect foundation for your AdWords campaign, the product pages on Google Shopping and PLAs on Google’s result page. Applying the knowledge of the previous points to the feed, would lead to the following data feed optimizations:

  • Modify your feed to match Google’s format.
  • Assign the right Google Category to your products
  • Use your best picture as the primary image_link
  • Rewrite your Titles for maximum impact
  • Create AdWords Labels or AdWords Groups in your feed
  • Exclude your poor performers

Data feed management can be done in many different ways, but there is one guiding principle: you need to optimize your feed continuously to run a successful campaign on Google Shopping and other Shopping Channels.

About the Author
Jacques van der Wilt has worked in online media for more than 20 years. He has held leadership positions in both the US and Europe. In the past 10 years he has worked as an entrepreneur and founded several start-ups. He is also a mentor at accelerator Startupboothcamp. As founder of WordWatch (automated bid management) he became an expert in search engine marketing for medium sized advertisers and with its spin-off DataFeedWatch (a web-based tool for merchants to optimize their data feed for Google Shopping and other comparison shopping channels) he established a leadership position in managing data feeds and Product Listing Ads campaigns.

The Top 5 APIs that PPC Advertisers Use to Rapidly Scale Online Ad Campaigns

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With various advertising channels available to PPC advertisers these days, it becomes extremely time-consuming to manage and maintain ad campaigns across multiple ad networks and accounts. Growing online ads has become a real challenge in such a fiercely competitive industry. That’s why APIs are becoming more prevalent as the next big trend that allow advertisers to save time and rapidly scale campaigns. API stands for Application Programming Interface, but what does that even mean? More importantly, how can it help you rapidly scale your online campaigns?

As it turns out, more and more sophisticated advertisers are turning to automated bid management tools, whether it be proprietary or from third-party vendors, like Marin Software or AdStage. With automated bidding in place, this allows advertisers to spend more time optimizing campaigns, and taking action on the data to scale faster. To do this with ease, advertisers access the top APIs to manage and scale their ad campaigns side by side, without having to export reports from each platform and data mine. Let’s take a look at the top 5 APIs that PPC advertisers leverage to rapidly scale their online ad campaigns:

1.  AdWords API: Google has dominated the revolutionary paid search advertising market since it launched AdWords in 2000. It’s also created several innovative tools that offers marketers a more convenient work-flow for managing and scaling profitable campaigns, such as The Conversion Optimizer, AdWords Editor, and Google’s Keyword Tool. However, while there are thousands of advertisers that only invest their digital marketing budgets on Google, there are still third-party tools, like WordStream, that cater to these advertisers because of AdWords’ intimidating and difficult to use platform. The AdWords API has proven to be quite useful for those marketers who don’t find the AdWords interface user-friendly.

2.  Bing Ads API: While Google is the top dog for paid search traffic, the top advertisers are savvy enough to realize that scaling ads beyond AdWords increases reach and overall returns from ad spend. A recent report shows that there are 153 million unique searchers on the Yahoo Bing Network and that these searchers spend 8% more than Google searchers. This means that 153 million people can only be reached through Bing Ads and will never be reached if only advertising through AdWords. This is one of the most compelling reasons why advertisers sync the two search channels up with the Bing Ads API.

3.  Facebook Ads API: Since the release of the Facebook Advertising API in 2011, Facebook has opened their API up to partner with over 260 vendors in over 45 countries. With all of the Facebook updates and lack of simplicity within the Facebook Ads self-serve platform, social advertisers have been turning to third-party solutions like AdParlor and Qwaya to successfully manage and scale their Facebook ad campaigns. Facebook’s innovation with ad formats, and their access to such valuable inventory has certainly been quite valuable to advertisers, but without the Facebook API available in user-friendly partner tools, the top advertisers would not be able to grow their campaigns and ad spend as quickly as they have.

4.  Twitter Ads API: Although still in private beta, the Twitter Ads API was released earlier this year with a few select partners. Twitter Advertising is taking off with its “pay-per-engagement” pricing model and ability to reach any industry and audience. Advertisers who are actively managing social profiles and looking for more brand awareness can do so with Twitter Advertising, which lends more followers and more syndication for tweets at scale. Online advertisers have been patiently waiting for this API to open up so they can easily measure and compare campaign performance with similar digital ad channels and automate bids accordingly.

5.  MixRank API: MixRank’s leading competitive intelligence tool allows advertisers to quickly spot their competitors’ top performing ads, keywords and placements. With the unveiling of MixRank’s API last year, we’ve seen an incredible amount of interest from advertisers who are looking to leverage competitive data to profitably scale their own campaigns. MixRank’s API can be easily integrated with your home-grown bidding solution or third-party online advertising management platforms, acting as a recommendation engine to influence bids, ad copy, keywords, and/or even placements to buy traffic on. These recommendations provide significant time savings when scaling profitable campaigns, as it eliminates over 50% in research and testing time. With the world’s largest database of online ads, MixRank’s API is versatile for all industries and markets. If you’d like to gain access to the MixRank API to leverage competitive insights with your bidding solution, sign up here.

If you’re one of the top online advertisers, you’ve probably used at least one, if not all of these APIs to manage and scale your campaigns. What makes an API highly adaptable for all of the top advertisers is when it can be leveraged in any industry for any market. These five APIs will certainly help you scale your online presence faster. And with the recommendation insights provided by MixRank’s API, you’ll be able to scale more intelligently and profitably. If you’re already leveraging a PPC bid management tool and want to scale your campaigns more intelligently by outperforming the competition, learn how with the MixRank API.  Sign up today.

Which Super Hero Would Your Online Marketing Strategy Be? The PPC Optimization Edition

Pay per click (PPC) ads aren’t successful over night, and as you know from our last post in this series, a few online advertising strategies or super heroic powers can be used to quickly optimize your campaigns to profitability. If you thought optimization strategies for PPC campaigns were boring and menial tasks think again, because you might be using these extraordinary powers in your daily routine.

The PPC Optimization Edition

Here are a few of our favorite X-Men characters and their powers that can be used for optimizing PPC campaigns. Tell us in the comments section below which character’s powers has given you the most performance lift when optimizing campaigns.

Wolverine: Campaign Segmentation

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The Super Power: Wolverine possesses retractable claws within each forearm. They can cut through practically any known solid material, segmenting metals, woods, and even stone into pieces. His abilities are similar to campaign segmentation, which is the process of breaking up your campaigns by network, location, or device. Wolverine’s ability to heal from any wound, disease or toxin at an accelerated rate is just another signal of proof that sharpening Wolverine’s powers of campaign segmentation can rapidly bring your poorly performing campaigns back from the dead.

How to Own It: Segmenting campaigns by network is the easiest way to exercise your inner Wolverine. Search and Display are two very different types of advertising channels, and should be measured and accounted for differently. To segment an existing campaign, you can visit the AdWords campaign settings and edit the “Type” of campaign. In Bing Ads, it’s a bit trickier to segment by network, but it absolutely can be done at the Ad group level under Advanced Settings in the “Ad distribution” field. If you’re already segmenting by network, wield your Wolverine claws with a more advanced strategy: segment by location or device. When segmenting by location or device, this allows you to create more relevant ad copy for the location or ad extensions for the particular device and gives you the control to set bids higher for strategic markets or devices with smaller screens.

Storm: Dayparting

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The Super Power: Storm is one of the most influential mutants on the planet, with the power to manipulate the weather. Her precise control over the atmosphere allows her to create special weather effects such has whirlwinds, humidity, precipitation, lighting, and atmospheric pressure. Just like the weather, your ads’ performance changes throughout the day. In order to control that performance in your favor, create a Storm moment with dayparting.

How to Own It: In order for this power to work in your favor, you’ll need to have some data from your existing ads or keywords so you can see what hours of the days are getting the most clicks or acquiring the most conversions. To analyze the hour by hour trends in AdWords, go to the Dimensions tab at the Ad group level and make sure to open the View: Hour of day report. In Bing Ads, you can view the same report by visiting the Reports tab, and selecting the Show: Hour of day report. Now that you’re equipped with the right data to control the weather of your ads, create a Storm by adjusting the Schedule settings at the Ad group level.

Morph: Dynamic Creative

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The Super Power: Morph, as his name suggests, is a shape shifter and can morph his physical appearance and voice to resemble any person or object he chooses. His ability to alter his form is similar to the way advertisers can use dynamic creatives to instantly change the ad copy for more relevancy to the audience. Morph also has limited telepathic abilities, allowing him the ability to read minds, similar to the way dynamic keyword insertion can automatically insert the keyword that’s on a person’s mind.

How to Own It: In order to perfect the powers of Morph, you’ll need to use dynamic creatives. You can either use dynamic text or dynamic keyword insertion for your ads. The way dynamic text works if you want to make changes to many of your ads without having to edit them all of them manually. Dynamic keyword insertion is when your ad automatically uses the keyword that was queried in your ad. There are many types of dynamic insertion tags you can use in your headlines, description lines, and display URLs, such as {Keyword:text}, {param1:text}, and {param2:text}. If you’re not already Morph-ing your ads and want to find out how powerful and efficient this strategy can be for your business, Morph your ads and use dynamic creatives in AdWords or Bing Ads.

Have you used these super powers when running your online ad campaigns? Let me know in the comments which character’s powers you’ve used in the past, and how you were able to own it to optimize your campaigns.

What Are Dynamic Search Ads?

Last week, Google announced that Dynamic Search Ads would be generally available to advertisers within AdWords.  This feature has been around for about a year now, but it was only available in a limited beta.  So, if you’re like me and were not included in this beta, you’re probably wondering: “What are Dynamic Search Ads (DSAs)?”  Well, look no further; you’ve come to the right place!  With AdWords having multiple support pages on this topic, I’ve condensed their DSA description to summarize what you need to know about DSAs, how to set them up, and how this could help you.

 

What You Need To Know about DSAs:

  • Say Goodbye to Keywords: With DSAs, your ad will show based on the content of your website
  • Say Hello to SEO: Google’s organic search index of your site will determine what search queries your DSAs get impressions for. So basically, this means whatever keywords you currently rank for through SEO will determine your ad impressions, but you have to pay for these clicks and impressions.
  • Dynamic Ad Copy: The headline is the only dynamic piece of the ad copy, and it’s generated based on the search term.  The rest of the ad is based on a template that you create.
  • Targeting Groups of Landing Pages: Since you’re not targeting keywords, you can set-up your targeting to your entire website, or specific pages or categories of your site.

 

Not Everything’s Changing:

  • Keyword-based campaigns can run simultaneously. DSAs will not show when there’s an exact match to one of your keywords.  However, the DSA could be shown instead of the other ad if it’s a broad or phrase match.
  • Ranking & cost per click is calculated in the same fashion using your Quality Score and bids
  • Reporting on search queries, ad copy and landing pages that were used to generate your DSA, as well as the same cost per click, click-through rate, impression & conversion rate data will be available.
  • Ability to add negative keywords or ad extensions.

 

How To Set Them Up:

1.  Within AdWords, click on the Campaigns tab and click the +New campaign drop down menu & select “Search Network Only.”

2.  On the Campaign Settings page, select “Dynamic Search Ads.”

Dsa-adwords

3.  You can then proceed to creating your ad groups.  In the “Create an ad” section, make sure to click Dynamic search ad.  You can add tracking to your URLs as well.

If you leave the “Auto targets” sectioned as checked to “All pages” this will target all pages that are indexed for your website, including subdomains.

Dsa-adgroup

4.  If you don’t want to target every page within this ad group, you can target by categories, URLs, page title, or page content.  To do this, select the Add a group of webpages button from the “Add dynamic ad target” section of the Auto targets tab and choose which targeting method you prefer.  Here are a few tips:

  • Categories: Google sets themes around your website content, so in order to target categories accurately, you should choose from the pick list of AdWords categories’ rather than entering your own.
  • URLs: You can target pages with URLs containing certain strings that you specify so your parameters do not have to be exact URLs, but rather any URL that contains, for example, “/support”.
  • Page title or Page content:  Select these targeting types if you want to designate specific keywords that are in the Page title or the Page content of your landing pages.  If your keyword is cameras, your ad target will appear as “PAGE_TITLE contains cameras” or “PAGE_CONTENT contains cameras”.

 

How This Could Help You:

  • Save Time on Paid Search by Continually Investing in SEO: If you’re already optimizing your site for organic rank, instead of building out an elaborate keyword strategy and paid search program to match up with all of your landing pages, you can turn on DSAs to take care of your targeting.  Just don’t forget to check back regularly and add negative keywords to eliminate the irrelevant impressions and clicks that could be hurting your campaign.
  • Increase Relevancy & Quality Score: With Google dynamically generating the headline based on the query, this increases your chances of the headline exactly matching the keyword.  When this happens, the headline is bolded, bringing more prominence to its appearance, and hopefully generating more clicks (for an increase in Quality Score).
  • Drive Incremental Traffic: With keyword-targeted campaigns, you can uncover keyword opportunities by looking at what clicks you received from your search query report, but you’ll never know all the search terms you received impressions for. With DSAs, you can promote your website to more potential customers than you can reach with a keyword-targeted campaign.

 

Alright, this wraps it up! I hope this gives you a stealthy answer to your burning AdWords question: What are Dynamic Search Ads?  As an added disclosure, Google recommends DSAs for sites that have multiple products or services, any products or services that change frequently, or product or services that are seasonal.  On the flip side, small websites with less than 300 landing pages, daily deal sites, comparison shopping sites, affiliate sites, or customizable products and gift websites should refrain from DSAs as they wouldn’t necessarily help your ad program.

 

Thanks for reading! For more AdWords insights, follow me on Twitter or add me to your G+ circles.

 

How to Crush the Competition on the Google Display Network

Ever wonder how your competitors are setting up their ad strategy or where they’re getting their most valuable traffic?  If you don’t keep up with your ads and continually optimize your reach, the competition is going to swoop in and take what’s yours.  That’s why we’ve put together this simple 5-step guide on how to crush the competition on the Google Display Network.

 

  1. Do Your Research: Conduct a competitive analysis of your top competitors.  I’m sure you know about MixRank, since you’re reading our blog.  So, head to mixrank.com, search for your competitor’s domains, and export all of the text ads, banner ads, and traffic sources to understand where you stand in relation to your competitors. 
  2. Drive More Reach:  Based on the ads you exported from your top competitors, cross-reference their campaign strategy against yours.  If they’re running significantly more campaigns than you, you know you’ll have re-visit your ad budget and scale your campaigns on other relevant sites.  On the other hand, of you’re competition isn’t running as many campaigns, that’s a good sign too that you don’t have to increase your budget tremendously to reach more customers. 
  3. Don’t Miss Out On the Traffic: From the traffic sources you exported from MixRank, add any placements that you’re not currently bidding on to your managed placements.  Be strategic about which ad groups you target these placements on, as the relevancy will impact your Quality Score.  To get started, make sure to add every placement on the exported list. If your competitor is running ads on these sites, you definitely don’t want to be left out.
  4. Optimize Your Budget:  As you know, not all placements will perform the same way. So, since you probably have some type of budget for your ad spend, you’ll need to monitor the performance of each placement and adjust your bids accordingly over time.  If you’re considering adding negative placements, it may be worthwhile to check back on MixRank to see if your competitors are still running ads on that traffic source before doing so.  You can delete a placement as well, which would be less drastic. By deleting a placement, your ad may still show up on the site but only when ad group’s topic or keyword targets are relevant to the content on the site.
  5. Leverage Banner Ads: Similar to search ads, contextual ads on the Display Network appear right beside your top competitors’.  To eliminate the chances of a consumer clicking on your competitor’s ad completely, occupy the entire ad unit with a banner ad.  The nice thing about banner ads is that certain sizes will almost guarantee your ad will be above the fold on most sites.  The most popular sizes are 728×90, 160×600 and 300×250, but from my experience, 160×600 ads don’t perform as well as the others.  Here’s a visual of an ad unit, and how banner ads drive out the competition’s ads:

 

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Contextualads

 

More Targeting Control With Flexible Reach On The Google Display Network

Last week, Google announced the new “Flexible reach” option on the Display Network.  This option will eventually replace Broad reach and Specific reach, the current targeting options available at the campaign level:

 

  • Broad reach shows your ads on pages that match the primary targeting method
  • Specific reach shows ads on pages that match all of your targeting methods

 

Flexible reach allows you to diversify your targeting at the ad group level.  With flexible reach, you can do the following all at the ad group level:

 

  • Select any combination of multiple targeting options
  • Combine different methods of targeting and bidding

 

For example, when adding placements to an ad group, you can either target only these placements or use these placements for bidding only.  When you only target these placements, you can set specific bids for these placements but your ads will only appear on these sites, eliminating your ads being shown anywhere else.  To use these placements for bidding only, you can also set specific bids on them, but this option also allows your ad to appear on other sites based on your keywords or other targeting methods within the ad group.

 

This new feature provides transparency into how your targeting selections are affecting the reach and impression volume of your campaigns.  When Flexible reach is enabled, by default, new ad groups will have the targeting setting selected when you add targeting methods to them, like placements. The same default setting applies when you add targeting methods to or delete targeting methods from your existing ad groups.

 

Flexible-reach

 

Are you ready to fine-tune where your ads appear by using the Flexible reach setting at the ad group level?  Learn more about using and enabling Flexible reach at the AdWords Help Center.

 

How to Take Action with AdWords’ Auction Insights Data

Google’s recent release of the Auction Insights report is a keyword-level report for search ads that shows competitors who are participating in the same auctions as you.  Similar to us at MixRank, Google knows the importance of monitoring and uncovering competitor ad trends to optimize campaigns – and now Google provides you the data to act upon it.

 

The report provides these five metrics at the keyword-level: impression share, average position, overlap rate, position above rate, and top of page rate.  Since an online campaign is never fully optimized, any additional data you can use to enhance your campaigns is worth analyzing.  The most actionable data points from this report are:

 

  • Impression Share:  This metric was previously only available at the ad-group and campaign level.  Identifying impression share down to the keyword level offers you a clear-cut answer to which keywords you should increase bids on.
  • Top of Page Rate:  Make sure your top of page rate is 100% for all branded terms.  If not, bid higher for branded keywords.  You certainly don’t want a competitor’s ad showing above the organic results for your brand.
  • Average Position:  Although you won’t be able to pinpoint why an advertiser’s average position moves up or down, you can make an educated guess that their Quality Score and click-through rate most likely went up or down.  For advertisers with a higher average position over time, consider using similar ad copy.

 

If you’re a fan of the Auction Insights report, you’ll find MixRank’s similar data for display ads fairly interesting.  Try MixRank to uncover competitor ads and industry trends for contextual and display ads.  Free to register: www.mixrank.com/register

 

Thanks for reading! Follow me on Twitter or add me to your Google+ circles to learn more about actionable online advertising data.

 

The Google Display Network’s Extreme Makeover

Just a few weeks ago, Google announced an incredible update to the Google Display Network.

 

1.  The Display Network Tab

First things first, over the next few weeks, Google will be rolling out a new Display Network Tab in AdWords. If you’re in the interface on a daily basis, you’ll find this news rather exciting. Display campaigns have always been managed in an interface that caters to search. Going forward, the Audiences, Topics and Networks tabs will now funnel into one place, allowing you to bid, target and optimize your display ads from a single location. Check out this screenshot of the interface provided by Google:

adwordsinterface/

  • Where to manage targeting for your ads, view your reports, and set bids: On the Display Network tab, you can find the Display Keywords, Placements,Topics, and Interests & Remarketing tabs, the necessary tools to manage your display campaigns.
  • How to add or edit keywords for campaigns targeting search and display: If your campaign is targeting search and display, you can view display statistics on the Display Network tab. Similarly, the Keywords tab will show just search statistics. However, to add or edit keywords and bids, you must do so on the main Keywords tab.  Any changes you make to your keywords will affect both your search and display targeting.
  • Where to add or edit your targeting: In the Display Network tab, there is a Change display targeting button right above the graph where you can view the different targeting methods available for your campaign. From there, click the edit link next to the method you want to add or edit.
  • How to exclude a targeting method: Go to the Display Network tab, scroll down, and click the Exclusions link to where you can add exclusions to your ad group or campaign.

 

2.  The Revved-Up Contextual Engine

 Another update that deserves huge praise to Google is the “Revved-Up” Contextual Engine. This marvelous improvement takes targeting to the next level, using Next-Gen Keyword Contextual Targeting. This means you can now view data on a keyword by keyword basis on the display network, combining the reach of display with the precision of search. Say “Goodbye” to the old days of monitoring contextual campaigns at the ad group level and “Hello” to a better way to target and optimize your display campaigns.

Tips for using keywords for display ads:

  • Monitor your keyword performance. Pause keywords that have high costs, but very few conversions or low traffic to your site.
  • Increase bids on keywords that are performing well.
  • Add keywords similar to the ones that are performing well.

 

Keep in mind:

  • Any changes made to keywords in campaigns that target both Google search and the Display Network will also apply to search traffic. Before making any changes such as pausing keywords, make sure to check search performance.

3.  The Visualization Tool for Display Targeting

If that isn’t enough to inspire you, Google also introduces a new visualization tool that shows how reach is impacted from targeting across your display campaigns. Take a look:

 

targetingdiagram/

 

With this nifty venn diagram, you can see how your targeting affects your reach. Targeting types include keywords, placements, topics, interests or remarketing.

  • Use-case for targeting diagram: When adding or editing your Display Network targeting, you’ll see a diagram that shows how your targeting methods, like keywords and placements, interact, and what method is used to target your ads.
  • Tip for advertisers with niche target markets: With a niche target market, you’ll want to get the most quality traffic and the cheapest cost. We recommend you have several targeting types, drilling down to very specific keywords, managed placements, topics and interests.
  • Tip for advertisers with large product catalogs: For large retail advertisers that want the most reach, we recommend using keyword targeting and automatic placements to start. Automatic placements are sites that your ads will appear on based on the keywords you’ve chosen. Over time, you’ll need to monitor the placements. Increase bids on placements that are performing well and exclude placements that are high in cost but generating low traffic or few conversions. However, keep in mind that if you exclude too many placements, you might significantly limit your traffic.

 

Whether you’re new at display advertising, or have been doing this for years, we can safely say that Google’s new and improved campaign management features for display means this much-needed change was brought on by a large amount of advertisers spending a lot of money on display ads and placements. Google would not invest so much time and resources to update the AdWords platform if it wasn’t already working perfectly for display advertisers. So, what’s this all mean? More advertisers today are investing ad dollars into display advertising. If you’re not already doing the same, you’re behind in the curve and you may want to start with a few campaigns. To save you time and money, try uncovering what type of ads your competitors are running with MixRank’s free intelligence tool here.